3 Topics to Discuss at Your First Prenatal Appointment

When you see those pink lines on the pregnancy test, you’re probably over the moon and filled with questions. As soon as you learn you’re pregnant, it's good to get in touch with your family doctor, midwife, or OB/GYN. Even if you have yet to choose a doctor to guide your pregnancy, it's still important to contact someone soon to establish prenatal care. First prenatal appointments typically are scheduled when you’re 8-12 weeks pregnant.

What to expect at your first prenatal appointment

Your first prenatal appointment might be one of the longest you’ll have throughout your pregnancy. At this appointment, you get to know your doctor and the team at The Association for Women’s Health Care. They believe that the more comfortable you are at the beginning of the pregnancy journey, the more at ease you’ll be later if you need to reach out with questions or concerns.

During this first appointment, your doctor performs a checkup and a few tests. Your blood pressure, pulse, and weight are checked, as well as the baby's heartbeat. Blood and urine tests are ordered and a pelvic exam conducted.

Your doctor has plenty to ask you and information to provide you, but it's important that you come somewhat prepared as well. With that in mind, The Association for Women's Health Care says you should be prepared to discuss the following at your first prenatal appointment:

1. Your health

Your doctor asks you about your health history, your family health history, and your current health situation. It’s recommended that you write down any important information beforehand and bring it with you. Otherwise, you might forget something in the excitement of your first prenatal appointment.

Among the items your doctor wants to touch on are your mental health and any medicines you’re taking or have recently taken. It's extremely important to be open about everything here, even if you feel uneasy or ashamed for some reason. For example, maybe you have anxiety issues or perhaps are taking antidepressants. Your doctor needs to know all the details so they can best help you have a healthy baby.

2. Questions you have

Just like with your medical history, it's best to jot down any questions you have for the doctor before your appointment. It’s not always easy to remember questions while you’re sitting in a doctor’s office.

To help you get started, here are some questions you might want to ask your doctor:

Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Some of the answers may not come until later in the pregnancy — for example, details on what happens during your labor and delivery — but feel free to ask. Your doctor will listen. They want to make sure you’re comfortable and content.

3. Personal habits

It’s important to be honest with your doctor about your personal habits and current lifestyle. With that information, they can advise you on what you might need to change for the duration of your pregnancy. That conversation likely will focus on such issues as exercise, occupation, physical labor, sex, nutrition, alcohol consumption, and smoking.


If you would like to schedule a first prenatal appointment or have questions regarding your prenatal care, call us or book online today.

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