• Female Urinary Incontinence: It's More Common Than You Think

    on Feb 8th, 2019

If you suffer from urinary incontinence (UI), you may think you’re alone. This is far from the case though, as research shows millions of women suffer from UI. The professional team at The Association for Women’s Healthcare has helped thousands of women regain their sense of self by successfully treating their loss of bladder control.

Many women have urinary incontinence

One-third of women over age 35 have stress incontinence. And that number increases to around half of all women over age 65. Many factors can lead a woman to develop urinary incontinence, including pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, and certain medications.

Age is not the only factor in developing urinary incontinence. It can develop as a result of a genetic disorder, from being overweight, from having a chronic cough, and other factors.

Stress incontinence is when urine leaks due to an increase in pressure on the pelvic floor, such as from coughing, sneezing, bending or jumping.

Another type of incontinence is called overactive bladder, which causes a sudden urge to urinate even though it may not be needed. This can occur as an overlapping condition or on its own. There are an estimated 33 million men and women suffering from overactive bladder.

Treatment can improve your quality of life

The good news is once the cause of your urinary incontinence is diagnosed, treatment is possible. Of course, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of your condition, but the team at The Association for Women’s Healthcare will do everything possible to help.

Exercises

No matter how severe your incontinence is, you will likely benefit from pelvic floor muscle strengthening. The muscles in your pelvic floor are the same muscles you use to stop and start the flow of urine.

Begin by contracting your muscles just as you would to stop the flow of urine. Hold for 3 seconds, then release for 3 seconds. Build up to 10 seconds as you practice each day. No one can tell you’re doing these exercises, so practice when you’re in your car, at your desk, or browsing the internet.

Inserts

For more severe cases of urinary incontinence, you may be given medical inserts, such as urethral inserts or pessaries. A urethral insert is inserted into your urethra, much like you insert a tampon into your vagina. It’s used specifically to block urine leaks during certain activities, and it is removed before you urinate.

In cases of urinary incontinence caused by pelvic organ prolapse, a pessary, which is a stiff, donut-shaped insert, is inserted into your vagina to support your bladder. This prevents urine leaks.

If these treatments don’t solve your urinary incontinence, you may be referred for surgery.

If you want to end your urinary incontinence, book an appointment online or over the phone with The Association for Women’s Healthcare today. Our caring and compassionate physicians are ready to help.

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